Meco Spanish Meaning Of Essay

Italian proverbs are short expressions of popular wisdom from Italy and other countries where Italian is spoken.

A[edit]

  • A chi bene crede, Dio provvede.
    • English equivalent: God listens to those who have faith/ Have faith and God shall provide.

- A chi= those/them/generalising. Bene crede=good faith, decent faith, genuinely. Dio= God provvede=provides.

    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 873. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • A chi parla poco, gli basta la metà del cervello.
    • English equivalent: Least said, soonest mended.
    • "In private animosities and verbal contentions, where angry passions are apt to rise, and irritating, if not profane expressions are often made use of - the least said, the better in general. By multiplying words, cases often grow worse instead of better."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalentPorter, William Henry (1845). Proverbs: Arranged in Alphabetical Order .... Munroe and Company. pp. 125. 
    • Emanuel Strauss (1994). "1383". Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs. II. Routledge. p. 1053. ISBN 978-1-136-78978-6. 
  • A mali estremi, estremi rimedi.
    • English equivalent: Desperate times call for desperate measures.
    • "Drastic action is called for – and justified – when you find yourself in a particularly difficult situation."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 53. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 10 August 2013. 
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). "797". Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs. II. Routledge. p. 687. ISBN 978-1-136-78978-6. Retrieved on 27 November 2013. 
  • A goccia a goccia s'incava la pietra.
    • English equivalent: Constant dropping wears away the stone.
    • "A drop hollows out the stone by falling not twice, but many times; so too is a person made wise by reading not two, but many books."
    • (Giordano Bruno, Il Candelaio)
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 187. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Ad ogni pazzo piace il suon del suo sonaglio.
    • English equivalentː Every fool is pleased with his own folly.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). "147". Dictionary of European Proverbs. I. Routledge. p. 139. ISBN 978-1-134-86460-7. 
  • Ad ogni uccello il proprio nido è bello.
    • English equivalent: The bird loves her own nest.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). "923". Dictionary of European Proverbs. II. Routledge. p. 776. ISBN 978-1-134-86460-7. 
  • Al piu potente ceda il più prudente.
    • English equivalent: Better bow than break.
    • "It is better to make some confession, or pay a little deference to others, our neighbors, friends, acquaintances, and especially our superiors, rather than lose our credit or break friendship."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Porter, William Henry (1845). Proverbs: Arranged in Alphabetical Order .... Munroe and Company. p. 46. 
    • Ward, Caroline (1842). National Proverbs in the Principal Languages of Europe. J.W. Parker. p. 20. 
  • Anche il pazzo dice talvolta parole da savio.
    • English equivalent: Even a fool may give a wise man counsel.
    • "Even as the fingers of the two hands are equal, so are human beings equal to one another. No one has any right, nor any preference to claim over another. You are brothers."
    • Muhammad, The Last Sermon of Muhammad delivered on the Ninth Day of Dhul Hijjah 10 A.H (c. 630 AD)
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 40. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Anche il sole passa sopra il fango, e non s'imbratta.
    • Translation: The sun passes over filth and is not defiled.
    • Italian proverb, quoted in Proverbs, Maxims and Phrases of All Ages : Classified Subjectively and Arranged Alphabetically (1887) by Robert Christy, p. 322.
  • Anche in paradiso non è bello essere soli.
    • English equivalent: Even in paradise it is not good to be alone.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1106. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Amare e non essere amato, quanto risponde sens esser chiamato. To love and be loved as it is meant to be
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 676. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Amicizia di signore non è retaggio; chi troppo se ne fida non è saggio.
    • English equivalent: A king's favour is no inheritance.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 24. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Amor, tosse e fumo, malemente si nascondono.
    • English equivalent: Love, smoke and cough are hard to hide.
    • Kelly, Walter Keating (1859). Proverbs of all nations. W. Kent & co. (late D. Bogue). p. 50. 
  • Amor tutti eguaglia.
    • English equivalent: Love makes all equal.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 767. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Anche la legna storta dà fuoco diritto.
    • English equivalent: Crooked logs make straight fires.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 683. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • A caval donato non si guarda in bocca.
    • English equivalent: Look not a gift horse in the mouth.
    • "And so with respect to gifts and donations in general, whether their value be more or less, they should be accounted tokens of kindness and received with promptness and cordiality."
    • Source for meaning: Porter, William Henry (1845). Proverbs: Arranged in Alphabetical Order .... Munroe and Company. p. 127. 
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 52. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • A carne di lupo, zanne di cane.
    • English equivalent: You must meet roughness with roughness.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 12. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • A chi dai il dito si prende anche il braccio.
    • Translation: Give them a finger and they'll
    • English equivalent: Give an inch and they'll take a mile.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volym 1. Routledge. p. 828. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • A chi Dio vuol castigare leva il cervello.
    • English equivalent: Whom God will destroy, he first make mad.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 841. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • A torto si lagna del mare chi due volte ci vuol tornare.
    • English equivalent: He complains wrongfully at the sea that suffer shipwreck twice.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 898. ISBN 0415096243. 

English equivalent: Help yourself, and God will help you.

    • "When in trouble first of all every one himself should do his best to improve his condition."
    • Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 150. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
    • Maurus (2002). Nella sofferenza aiutati che Dio ti aiuta. Segno. ISBN 8872826551. 
  • Al confessore, medico e avvocato, non tenere il ver celato.
    • English equivalent: Conceal not the truth from thy physcian and lawyer.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 666. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Assai pampini e poca uva.
    • English equivalent: He that promises too much means nothing.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 92. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Aspetta, caval, che l'erba cresca.
    • English equivalent: While the grass grows the steed starves.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1228. ISBN 0415096243. 

B[edit]

  • Batti il ferro finché è caldo.
    • Translation: Strike while the iron is hot.
    • Sabopak (1997). Battere il ferro finchéècaldo. Gruppo Editoriale Tipografico. ISBN 8887189005. 
  • Bella in vista, dentro è trista.
    • English equivalent: A fair face and a foul heart.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 35. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Ben finisce chi considera il fine.
    • Translation: He ends well who considers the end.
    • English equivalent: Whatever you do, act wisely, and consider the end.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 600. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Bisogna accomodarsi ai tempi.
    • English equivalent: Gnaw the bone which is fallen to thy lot.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 865. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Bisogna prima pensare e poi fare.
    • English equivalent: A closed mouth catches no flies.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 751. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Bisogna rischiare la scardola per avere il salmone.
    • Translation: Who wants to win a gander, you need to weigh Drake.
    • English equivalent: Set a herring to catch a whale.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1134. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Bisogna saper afferrare l'occasione pei capelli.
    • English equivalent: Opportunity knocks only once.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 400. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Bocca di miele, cuore di fiele.
    • English equivalent: A honey tongue and a heart of gall.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 108. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Buon principio fa buon fine.
    • English equivalent: A good beginning makes a good ending; Well begun, is half done.
    • Meaning: Starting properly ensures the speedy completion of a process. A – beginning is often blocked by one or more obstacles (potential barriers) the removal of which may ensure the smooth course of the process.
    • Source for proverb: Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 24. ISBN 0415160502. 
    • Source for meaning: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). European Proverbs in 55 languages. DeProverbio.com. p. 228. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
  • Buon seme dà buoni frutti.
    • Translation: Good tree makes good fruit.
    • English equivalent: The fruit of a good tree is also good.
    • Meaning: Good parents will make good children due to example followed closely and daily.
    • Giuseppe Catenacci (1967). L'avvocato in paradiso. Gastaldi. p. 259. Retrieved on 9 June 2013. 

C[edit]

  • È meglio qualche cosa che niente
    • English equivalent: Better an egg today than a hen tomorrow.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 75. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Can che abbaia non morde.
    • Translation: The dog that barks doesn't bite.
    • English equivalent: Barking dogs seldom bite.
    • Meaning: People who make the most or the loudest threats are the least likely to take action.
    • Source for meaning: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 17. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 20 June 2013. 
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 146. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Camminare sopra il filo di un rasoio.
    • English equivalent: Do not play with edged tools.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 716. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Carta canta.
    • English equivalent: If the beard were all, the goat might preach.
    • Meaning: Mere formal signs of being an authority does not make you one.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 117. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Cavallo riscaldato, (e garzon ritornato), non fu mai buono.
    • English equivalent: Take heed of enemies reconciled and of meat twice boiled.
    • Meaning: Your former enemies might cunningly take revenge on you just out of spite.; Trust not a reconciled enemy more than an open foe.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 25. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Chi affoga s'attaccherrebbe alle funi del cielo
    • English equivalent: A drowning man plucks at a straw.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 33. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Chi ama me, ama il mio cane.
    • Translation: Whoever loves me, loves my dog.
    • English equivalent: Love me, love my dog.
    • Meaning: If you love someone, you will virtually like everything about him.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 953. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Chi aspettar suole, ha ciò che vuole.
    • English equivalent. He that can have patience can have what he will.
    • Other English equivalent: Patience is a remedy for every sorrow.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 87. ISBN 0415160502. 
    • Chi ben commincia è meta dell’opra.
    • Translation: Who well begins, is half way through his task.
    • Meaning. Having made the right preparations when beginning a project will save you a lot of time.
    • Carlo Goldoni, Il filosofo di campagna (The Country Philosopher) (1752), Part II, scene I (translation by Lesbina); reported in Thomas Benfield Harbottle and Philip Hugh Dalbiac, Dictionary of Quotations (French and Italian) (1904), p. 261.
  • Chi da se stesso può fare alcuna cosa, non aspetti che altri la faccia.
    • Translation: Who by himself can do anything, do not wait for others to do.
    • English equivalent: For what thou canst do thyself, rely not on another.
    • Latin equivalent: Ne quid expectes amicos, quod tute agere possis.
      • Translation: Expect nothing from friends, do what you can do yourself.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 600. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Chi di gallina nasce, convien che razzoli.
    • Translation: As the abbot sings, so the sacristan responds.
    • Meaning: Children will become like older generations.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1998). Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 138. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Chi di gatta nasce, sorci piglia.
    • English equivalent: What is bred in the bone will not go out of the flesh.
    • Meaning: You can seldom change human nature with the help of logic.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 985. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Chi disordani da giovane se ne pente da vecchio.
    • English equivalent: They who would be young when they are old must be old when they are young.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). "1605". Dictionary of European proverbs. II. Routledge. p. 1151. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Chi due lepri caccia, l'una non piglia, e l'altra lascia.
    • English equivalent: You must not run after two hares at the same time.
    • Meaning: "Concentrate on one thing at a time or you will achieve nothing. - Trying to do two or more things at a time, when even one on its own needs full effort, means that none of them will be accomplished properly."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Paczolay, Gyula (1997). "X". European proverbs: in 55 languages, with equivalents in Arabic, Persian, Sanskrit, Chinese and Japanese. Veszprémi Nyomda. p. X. ISBN 1-875943-44-7. 
    • ** Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 102. 
  • Chi ha capo di cera non vada al sole.
    • Translation: Who has a head of wax should not be in the sunshine.
    • English equivalent: He that hath a head of wax must not walk in the sun.
    • Meaning: Know your limitations and weaknesses; Don't do something that is sure to damage you.
    • Ward, Caroline (1842). National proverbs in the principal languages of Europe. J.W. Parker. p. 54. 
  • Chi ha fatto il male, faccia la penitenza.
    • Translation: What you reap is what you sow.
    • Strauss (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 394. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Chi ha più giudizio più n'adoperi.
    • Translation: To whom much is entrusted, much is required.
    • English equivalent: Everybody to whom much is given, much is expected.
    • Meaning: "More is expected of those who have received more - that is, those who had good fortune, are naturally gifted, or have been shown special favour."
    • Source for meaning and proverbs: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 75. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 8 September 2013. ** Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 1095. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Chi ha una retta coscienza possiede un regno.
    • English equivalent: His own desire leads every man.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 977. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Chi he sano e da pie del Sultano.
    • English equivalent: Good health is above wealth.
    • "What shall it profit a man if he gains the whole world-and loses his health?"
    • Dale Carnegie, How to Stop Worrying and Start Living (1948)
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 879. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Chi ha nome, ha robe
    • English equivalent: A good name is the best of all treasures.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 58. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Chi da giovane ha un vizio, in vecchiaia fa sempre quell'uffizio.
    • Translation: Old habits die hard.
    • Source: Strauss, Emmanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volym 1. Routledge. p. 1122. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Chi dorme non piglia pesci.
    • Translation: Those who sleep don't catch any fish.
    • English equivalent: Early to bed and early to rise, makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise.
    • Meaning: "A lifestyle that involves neither staying up late nor sleeping late is good for body and mind and leads to financial success."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent: Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 70. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. Retrieved on 5 September 2013. 
    • Strauss (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 147. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Chi due lepri caccia, l'una non piglia e l'altra lascia.
    • English equivalent: Grasp all, lose all
    • Strauss, Emmanuel (1994). Dictionary of European Proverbs, Volym 1. Routledge. p. 886. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Chi fa da sé, fa per tre.
    • Translation: He who works by himself does the work of three (people).
    • English equivalent: If you want something done right, do it yourself.
    • Note: ironically contradicted by: "L'unione fa la forza" ("Union produces might.")
    • Boerio, Manin (1829). Dizionario del dialetto veneziano. A. Santini. p. 13. 
  • Chi lascia la via vecchia per la nuova, sa quel che lascia, ma non sa quel che trova.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1998). Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs (Abbreviated ed.). Routledge. p. 638. ISBN 0415160502. 
  • Chi mal pensa, mal abbia.
    • English equivalent: Shame take him that shame thinketh.
    • Meaning: Don't think evil of others since they most likely act the way they do because of situational factors: Never attribute something to malice which can adequately be explained by stupidity.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. entry 806. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Chi male comincia, peggio finisce.
    • English equivalent: A bad beginning makes a bad ending.
    • Meaning: "It is as impossible that a system radically erroneous, once commenced, should end well, as it is that a mathematical problem, commenced wrong, should come out right."
    • Source for meaning: William Henry Porter (1845). Proverbs: Arranged in Alphabetical Order .... Munroe and Company. p. 202. 
    • Emanuel Strauss (1994). "1". Concise Dictionary of European Proverbs. Routledge. p. 1. ISBN 978-1-136-78978-6. 
  • Chi non fa quando può, non fa quando vuole.
    • English equivalent: He that will not when he may, when he will he may have nay.
    • Meaning: "Take advantage of an opportunity when it presents itself, even if you do not want or need it at the time, because it may no longer be available when you do."
    • Source for meaning of English equivalent:Martin H. Manser (2007). The Facts on File Dictionary of Proverbs. Infobase Publishing. p. 120. ISBN 978-0-8160-6673-5. 
    • Kelly, Walter Keating (1859). Proverbs of all nations. W. Kent & co. (late D. Bogue). p. 41. 
  • Chi non può fare come vuole, faccia come può.
    • English equivalent: Do as you may, if you can't do as you could.
    • "Now you can't have it you want it!"
    • Mitchell Hurwitz, Arrested Development (2003-2006)
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 707. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Chi non sa obbedir, non sa comandar.
    • Translation: He who has not obeyed, cannot command.
    • English equivalent: Who has not served cannot command.
    • Meaning: One must have been controlled in the same situation one wishes to properly control others.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 855. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Chi non si lascia consigliare, no si può aiutare.
    • Translation: He who can't be advised, can also not be helped.
    • English equivalent: He that will not be counseled cannot be helped.
    • It is always a silly thing to give advice, but to give good advice is absolutely fatal.
    • The Portrait Of Mr. W. H. (1889), p. 5.
    • Meaning: Advice often contain a genuine warning or an effective suggestion, which is unprudent not to take into consideration.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. 964. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Chi non tura bucolia, tera bucape.
    • English equivalent: A stitch in time saves nine.
    • "No one needs to be told that a vast deal of labor is expended unnecessarily. This is occasioned, to a great extent, by the neglect of seasonable repairs."
    • Source for meaning:Porter, William Henry (1845). Proverbs: Arranged in Alphabetical Order .... Munroe and Company. p. 13. 
    • Mawr, E.B. (1885). Analogous Proverbs in Ten Languages. p. 6. 
  • Chi mal pensa, mal abbia.
    • English equivalent: Shame take him that shame thinketh.
    • Meaning: Don't think evil of others since they most likely act the way they do because of situational factors: Never attribute something to malice which can adequately be explained by stupidity.
    • Strauss, Emanuel (1994). Dictionary of European proverbs (Volume 2 ed.). Routledge. p. entry 806. ISBN 0415096243. 
  • Chi non ha danari in borsa, abbia miel in bocca.
    • Translation: He who has no money in the purse must have honey in the mouth

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